African American Heritage Tour of Savannah, Georgia

By Nicole Brewer

Savannah, Georgia, has a rich history in not only American history, but in African American history. For several generations, Africans who were brought to the region during the trans-Atlantic slave trade formed their own Geechee and Gullah cultures, raised families, and created their own cultures through the construction of churches and more. Black Heritage continues to shine in Savannah as a reminder of the strength and resilience of African Americans in the past from this region. While there are many things to do and see in Savannah, consider an African American Heritage tour, as it’s a great option to learn about the rich history.

Black History Tours

Take a walking tour with Footprints of Savannah, retracing the routes of the slave trade, black churches and the Underground Railroad. Learn about the story of Savannah’s antebellum years on this informative tour. The tours are offered daily starting at 10a.m. and begin in Wright Square. It tells the story of the slave trade from the Old County Courthouse to Bay Lane, as well as along the Factor’s Walk. Prices range from $20 for adults, to $10 for Seniors over 65.

Day Clean Journeys, which go by the Day Clean (dey-kleen) Geechee Gullah philosophy of “Each day is a new day; each day starts anew; no matter what occurred yesterday – today is a new day!”, takes its participants on a journey like no other to explore the historic African American experience. They provide informative and stimulating journeys filled with a Soul experience to educate visitors about the African American experience in Savannah.

Savannah, Georgia pic via Trover.com.
Savannah, Georgia pic via Trover.com.

History Museums

The Pin Point Heritage Museum celebrates the life and history of Gullah/Geechee community that call the Pin Point area their home. It is located in the old A.S. Varn & Son Oyster area, near the Crab Factory. Spend a day exploring the renovated museum complex, enjoying hands-on experiences, exhibits, and multimedia presentations.

The Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum is named after the great pioneer Dr. Ralph Mark Gilbert, who was the father of Savannah’s Civil Rights Movement and the head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). It is located at 460 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. The museum documents the civil rights issues of Georgia’s oldest African American community from slavery to present day. The museum features classrooms, lecture halls, a video/reading room and an African American book collection for children.

Soul Food

Learn how to make traditional southern cuisine by being a chef for a day with Chef Joe Randall’s Cooking School. Have a fun time making speciality dishes from crabcakes to fried catfish with Joe Randall, who is a 50-year veteran of the food service and hospitality industry and the founding board member of the Southern Food Alliance.

Hotels

Consider a stay at Andaz Savannah – a concept by Hyatt, to be centrally located in Savannah, near Ellis Square and a short distance from Franklin Square; if you are considering these historic walks and tours. The Inn At Ellis Square – A Days Hotel is a viable option that is centrally located in Savannah to enjoy these African American history tours, museums, and dining options.

**This is a sponsored post opportunity via Hipmunk with their #HipmunkCityLove Project. The content is my own.**

  1. ken says

    Finding hidden African American history is like deep sea diving. Every time you search you find something unexpected. On a 2008 visit to Stagville plantation, just north of Durham, NC, I was transfixed by the sight of fingerprints encased in the brickwork of a former cabin for enslaved Africans. The bricks were actually made at the plantation, and the fingerprints were made because enslaved workers were forced to remove brick from the kiln before they were cool and dry. This was done to “speed up” production. For the full story on my Stagville tour go to my blog, thecolorofhistory.blogspot.com. The post is titled “DNA in the Brickwork”. Stagville is now a North Carolina state museum.

    1. Globe trot says

      Great post! Thanks for sharing this info.

  2. Chanel | Cultural Xplorer says

    I have been meaning to get back to Savannah for a while now, and I will definitely have to check out some of these tours and places when I go back!

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